Category Archives: Hope

Why, Why, Why

As a toddler teacher, I am no stranger to The Why Stage. It seems like they just started forming words at all and now all of my words have to have articulated reasons to support them.

Every child gets there. And every parent that comes in my classroom has experienced it—or will very soon.

“It’s time to go home, honey,” a mom will say when she picks her child up.

“Why?”

“Because it’s dinnertime.”

“Why?”

“Because we’re hungry.”

“Why?”

Because. Just because.

But toddlers are people, too, and their “Why?” questions point to a human reality that may be hidden deep but resides in each of us.

There are things we wonder about.

Mark 2

I know that headings aren’t inspired, but my Bible translation divides Mark 2 into four passages which are (paraphrased): Jesus heals a paralytic, Jesus calls a tax collector to be a disciple, people notice Jesus’ disciples didn’t fast, and people saw Jesus disciples’ pick grain on the Sabbath.

If we take each of these as separate stories, we can draw out applications and catalog the stories in our memories. We can make our little outline and determine what we’re supposed to think about it.

But they’re one story—just like the entire Bible itself. And if we read them together, we’ll see something: In each of these four passages, somebody asks “Why?”

And none of them are toddlers.

Continue reading Why, Why, Why

Today Was Not My Day

My toddler class had a rough day. We had a child who stayed home sick, a teacher who stayed home sick with something else, and another child who threw up in the classroom. We had several fussy kids who were tired and teething and I’m not sure what else.

After everyone finally settled down for nap, one little guy who had already had a rough day woke up way too early. No matter what I tried, he was still fussy and uncomfortable, crying in a sad little voice unless we walked the halls together. Poor guy had to be held the rest of naptime, so my long “Things To Do While They Sleep” list is still…long.

Every Single Blessing

Paul wrote Ephesians while he was in prison, to a church who faced growing uncertainty and the challenges of living as Christians in first-century Roman territory. He opened Ephesians characteristically, with praise to “the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places” (Ephesians 1:3). Wait. Every spiritual blessing.

Every?

Continue reading Today Was Not My Day

Thou Mine Inheritance

The Israelites pressed forward, spurred on in their quest to obtain their inheritance by conquering the enemies around them and claiming enemy land as their own. They were following the charge God gave to Joshua, courageously taking hold of the inheritance they had been promised. They faced enemies and danger and exhaustion.

They fought.

What is Our Inheritance?

The New Testament also has this idea of inheritance. Peter tells us that, as Christians, our inheritance is “imperishable, undefiled, and unfading” (1 Peter 1:4). He compares this incredibly perfect inheritance with the pointless customs handed down to us as our earthly inheritance.

But just what do we inherit? What is it we are promised as children of God? Continue reading Thou Mine Inheritance

“A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War”

I have always been interested in World War II. The clear line between good and evil, the many stories of heroism, even by people who seemed so normal and ordinary before the demands of war loomed over them. There is just something epic and heroic about it.

Despite that interest, I have never really cared to learn about World War I. The endless, pointless trenches, the deadlocked armies with no real cause, the victory that only spurned another international war less than twenty years later. I never really understood any of it.

According to Joseph Loconte, however, two incredible literary masterpieces were influenced by the horror and meaninglessness of WWI. It was during the horrendous conflict of World War I that two writers were shaped for their future classics, and without their wartime experiences, we may never have known and loved their works.

A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War opens with a description of WWI that is hard to imagine—and stomach. The early 1900s were a time of extreme optimism in the Western world, as the general opinion was that mankind was improving and socially evolving to a higher being. Many actually promoted war as a short and effective force of change. Needed change, the progressive minds thought. This change involved finding higher and better answers to questions of life, origin, and God—and, therefore, morality.

It was also a time of technological advances. Factories sprang up, and cities around those factories. More could be made with less time, effort, or money, and a whole generation had more time on their hands. Countries now had access to factory-produced, higher-grade firepower in more quantities than at any other time before.

Philosophy and technology had combined in a deadly way, and WWI would decimate an entire generation. “Between 1920 and 1923, Britain delivered four thousand headstones a week to France” Loconte writes. Millions died—and even more millions were injured. “In France, the casualty rate (dead or wounded) was an astonishing 75 percent.” The day’s belief in human progress had been shattered by the bitter reality of death rates and irreversible injuries.

In its place it left a gaping hole, experienced as despair by veterans and grieving loved ones alike. The loss and disillusion shook many who had been so confident.

But it was in that despair that C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien found a hope that can meet any hopelessness.

Throughout the pages of A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War, Loconte shows examples from Lewis’ and Tolkien’s works that illustrate how WWI affected them. We see their love for nature (in defiance of industrialization), their love for simplicity (over technology), and, overall, their still-standing faith when it seemed the rest of the world had lost theirs. We are given glimpses into Lewis’ spiritual wrestling and conversion, impacted in no small way by WWI and Tolkien.

In that searching they found a hope that is bigger than world wars and unmeasurable tragedies, and a foundation that stood firm no matter what headlines tried to shake it.

With over 600 footnotes for about 200 pages, Loconte’s work is researched to the extreme. The quotations from Lewis’ and Tolkien’s writings—both their books and their letters—give a deeper insight to the works that have been loved by so many.

“All the horrors of all the ages were brought together,” Winston Churchill said of the Great War. Lewis and Tolkien found hope that withstood the horror, and they decided to share it with others. By probing for their thoughts and documenting the worldview depth behind their works, Loconte has further shown that faith to us.

The “L” Word: 5 Ways Legalism Kills Community

Some friends of ours used to attend a different church. One with conservative beliefs and many children—two things close to our friends’ hearts as their own children were young.

But after awhile, our friends became concerned. A parenting book had been shared among the church members, and that was fine. Our friends had no problem with the book. But the other families in the church took what they read differently, and began parenting their children more strictly.

These churchgoing families had taken good intentions and developed them into rules to govern their children’s lives instead of engage their hearts. When our friends tried to share their concerns, they were silenced, and left the church under veiled accusations of disturbing the group’s unity.

  Continue reading The “L” Word: 5 Ways Legalism Kills Community